About your Search

20100401
20100430
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
these offices. >> amy, i think we got your point. mark halperin? >> well, greta, we knew that one of the challenges of writing a book about politics in this day and age a lot of our political discourse through the media and in politics directly has become very partisan. and we were trying to write a book, and we hope we did, it's not partisan. i'm confident we did but there was stuff in here that was not reported not just as aheut the there was a lot not reported by the republicans. we're heartened by the fact the book has received praise from people on the left and the right. sean hannity said some very nice things about the book and so did ed schultz. and the extent that it has won in this realm is that we reported everything that we could find that we thought was germane without fear of or favor. and with an eye towards history and illuminating what happened. not covering things up. there has been a concern, i'll just say quickly that, you know, why wasn't this stuff reported in real time? you know, people aren't going to be forthcoming the way they were with us in the heat of
candidates. really in the first debate more than the second, greta, you could actually see that and ha -- the hand on each candidate. host: why not say who they are? guest: it is not my role. i do not want to cause any issues on the final debate but we will just leave it at that. but you see the to petco -- you see the gepetto-like a puppeteering. but, greta, you can only go so far. if a candidate is pushed into being a certain way, obama-like, for example, or reagan-like, you can see that. if it does not work, the candidate is very, very uncomfortable. one of the reasons mr. clegg it did so well in the first debate was that he was very comfortable in his own skin to things that people said about barack obama even way back, that he seemed comfortable in his own skin. sometimes you could see the advisers handiwork. the second time you did not see it as much. maybe it was internalized by that time and they were able to be their own demand. people can see through that. host: what about gordon brown's performance and his comfort in that? guest: he is the older of the two, he is solid, he k
morning, marc, good morning, john, good morning, greta. i have seen you guys on other shows. one of the things that is fascinating to me is that the country seems to be in a state of cognitive dissonance. and barack obama is incompetent, unprepared, on qualified to be president, john mccain is this. based on what you guys have said this morning, the exact opposite -- the reverse is true to barack obama seems to be hope and change and all that, but he seems to be a very savvy politician, a brilliant strategic thinker, a very well- prepared, understands the issues, and yet all the buzz right now is about sarah palin, who mostly speaks -- her vocabulary is mostly monosyllabic, and i have not heard her say anything of substance in terms of public policy from the time she started running up until now. i am just amazed -- are you amazed that the country is so enamored with sarah palin, who lacks intellectual curiosity, lacks the depth. she is mostly a vacuous -- guest: i'm a big fan of monosyllabics, so i have to differ from the caller there at that that is a problem. with all due resp
and the banks have started to repay their loans from taxpayers. are we on our way to recovery? guest: greta, i wish i could say we were on our way to a vigorous recovery. we certainly are on our way to recovery. the business cycle follows isleton's law, but in reverse. everything that goes down eventually -- follows isaac newton's law, but in reverse. everything that it goes down and eventually comes up. the stock market is recovering in part because corporate earnings are up, and corporate earnings are up largely because companies have sliced their payrolls. they have cut their cost and, again, their payrolls, their employees, are their biggest cost. many companies are going abroad for sales. they're also going abroad for workers. so, what is good for america's big companies in terms of their property -- profitability and american stock market may not be necessarily good for american workers. we are seeing in this recovery a little bit of a two-tiered recovery, that is, big companies and wall street are doing very well. their workers and employees are doing ok. small businesses are doing badl
: greta, i watch you all the time. i have two statements. host: make it quick, mary. caller: yes, i will. regarding meeks, everyone keeps forgetting about meeks. one lady said yesterday that democrats need to vote for meeks. i'm going to be there. i'm going to vote for meeks. but see how republicans push everyone out, getting this rubio guy in there, the tea party. you're fooling yourself if you think rubio will win, but that's another story. guest: as far as meek goes, he's a fromi -- formidable candidate, a state trooper, an african american who can rally votes back there. and you have a race between meeks, rubio, and crist, it would seem to look good for meeks, because you would have crist and rubio duking it out for conservative votes. host: winston-salem, north carolina. larry, independent line. good morning. caller: one quick comment. a lot of people in this nation have forgotten we're a republic, not a two-party system or otherwise. this is the first time i've done this in my life, i hate what is happening to our nation. it's being torn asunder. i am sick of it. these people who g
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)